The Sunshine Hormone

The Latest News on Vitamin D

 Great Information on Vitamin D and Hundreds of LINKS to Vitamin D Information.

 

 

Information You Need To Know .....

 

WHAT IS VITAMIN D?

 

Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol): Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that helps maintain blood levels of calcium, by increasing absorption from food and reducing urinary calcium loss. Both functions help keep calcium in the body and therefore spare the calcium that is stored in bones. Vitamin D may also transfer calcium from the bone to the blood, which may actually weaken bones. Though the overall effect of vitamin D on the bones is complicated, some vitamin D is certainly necessary for healthy bones and teeth. Vitamin D is also produced by the human body during exposure to the ultraviolet rays of the sun. However, seasonal changes, latitude, time of day, cloud cover, smog, and sunscreen can all affect UV exposure. (www.nutritiondata.com/help/glossary#V)

Vitamin D deficiency is more common in northern latitudes, making vitamin D supplementation more important for residents of those areas. Vitamin D plays a role in immunity and blood cell formation and also helps cells differentiate—a process that may reduce the risk of cancer. From various other studies, researchers have hypothesized that vitamin D may protect people from multiple sclerosis, autoimmune arthritis, and juvenile diabetes. Vitamin D is also necessary to maintain adequate blood levels of insulin. Vitamin D receptors have been found in the pancreas, and some evidence suggests that supplements may increase insulin secretion for some people with adult-onset diabetes. (www.nutritiondata.com/help/glossary#V)

The high rate of natural production of vitamin D3 cholecalciferol (pronounced koh·luhkal·sifuhrawl) in the skin is the single most important fact every person should know about vitamin D—a fact that has profound implications for the natural human condition.

Technically not a "vitamin," vitamin D is in a class by itself. Its metabolic product, calcitriol, is actually a secosteroid hormone that targets over 2000 genes (about 10% of the human genome) in the human body. Currentresearch has implicated vitamin D deficiency as a major factor in the pathology of at least 17 varieties of cancer as well as heart disease, stroke, hypertension, autoimmune diseases, diabetes, depression, chronic pain, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, muscle weakness, muscle wasting, birth defects, periodontal disease, and more. (www.vitamindcouncil.org)

Many people are supplementing with 1,000 to 2,000 IU of vitamin D3 daily, but according to the Vitamin D Council that may not be enough. And blood testing is the only way to know for sure whether your regimen is appropriate. It’s hard to know exactly how much vitamin D your body is making from sun exposure. It depends on factors like what latitude you live at, your skin color and how much skin you expose for how long. And your needs may change according to the seasons, your age, your health and your weight. The Vitamin D Council suggests taking 5,000 IU of Vitamin D3 every day for three months, then get a 25-hydroxyvitamin D test. Optimal blood levels are between 50-80 ng/mL year-round. Adjust your dosage up or down according to your results. (www.vitamindcouncil.org)

A study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology indicated that people with low vitamin D levels might be twice as likely to suffer from a heart attack or stroke than those with higher vitamin D levels.

A University of California San Diego study found a 50 percent drop in colon cancer and a 30 percent decreased risk of ovarian and breast cancer with increased intake of vitamin D, which also reduced prostate cancer risk in men by 43 percent.

 

From the Vitamin D Council

January 12, 2010

Blood Levels

The marker for vitamin D status is 25-hydroxyvitamin-D [25(OH)D], a metabolite of vitamin D3. A 25(OH)D level determines whether a person is deficient, sufficient, or toxic in vitamin D. At this time, there is not a consensus in medicine in what blood levels define these categories.

The Vitamin D Council recommends maintaining serum levels of 50 ng/ml (equivalent to 125 nmol/L*), with the following reference ranges:

  • Deficient: 0-40 ng/ml (0-100 nmol/l)
  • Sufficient: 40-80 ng/ml (100-200 nmol/l)
  • High Normal: 80-100 ng/ml (200-250 nmol/l)
  • Undesirable: > 100 ng/ml (> 250 nmol/l)
  • Toxic: > 150 ng/ml (> 375 nmol/l)

(*Note: 25(OH)D levels can also be defined in units of nmol/L. The conversion between the two is [nmol/L]=2.5*[ng/ml])

The Vitamin D Council makes a recommendation of 50 ng/ml and defines the above reference ranges for the following reasons:

  • The human genome was selected with abundance of vitamin D. Humans evolved in the sun near the equator, synthesizing robust quantities of vitamin D in the skin. Research has shown that lifeguards, farmers near the equator, and sun dwelling hunter gatherers maintain blood levels between 40-80 ng/ml on sun exposure alone1,2,3.
  • The Vitamin D Council believes that the maternal 25(OH)D status necessary to provide antirachitic activity for offspring should be considered a biomarker for optimal vitamin D status in humans. Research shows that antirachitic activity in breast milk occurs at 45 ng/ml or higher, but not at 38.4 ng/ml or lower4.
  • Research has generally shown that parathyroid hormone is maximally suppressed at 40 ng/ml or higher, another finding that the Vitamin D Council considers a biomarker for optimal vitamin D status5,3.
  • The human body is usually unable to achieve 25(OH)D levels above 100 ng/ml on UVB exposure alone3. There are no studies to date to suggest that 25(OH)D levels over 100 ng/ml are beneficial, so the Vitamin D Council believes that the upper limit should be set at 100 ng/ml.
  • Vitamin D toxicity manifests itself by hypercalcuria and hypercalcemia. Research has shown that serum calcium levels are not related to 25(OH)D levels up to 257 ng/ml6, but cases of toxicity have been reported at levels as low as 194 ng/ml7. The Vitamin D Council believes that a conservative threshold of 150 ng/ml should be considered the lower limit of toxicity.

The Vitamin D Council recognizes that there are not enough controlled trials at this time to either support these recommendation or oppose these recommendations.

Read the full article at the link below:

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/further-topics/for-health-professionals-position-statement-on-supplementation-blood-levels-and-sun-exposure/

Blood Testing is the ONLY Reliable Way to Determine the Vitamin D level in your body. 

A blood test is extremely important!

 

ALWAYS: Check with your doctor BEFORE taking any vitamins or medications.

 

Recommended Daily Intake for Optimal Health

 Dr. Joseph Mercola    October 10, 2009

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/10/10/Vitamin-D-Experts-Reveal-the-Truth.aspx

 

Blood Testing is the ONLY Reliable Way to Determine the Vitamin D level in your body. 

A blood test is extremely important!

 

Based on the most recent research, the current recommendation is 35 IU’s of vitamin D per pound of body weight.

So for a child weighing 40 pounds, the recommended average dose would be 1,400 IU’s daily, and for a 170-pound adult, the dose would be nearly 6,000 IU’s.

However, it’s important to realize that vitamin D requirements are highly individual, as your vitamin D status is dependent on numerous factors, such as the color of your skin, your location, and how much sunshine you’re exposed to on a regular basis.

So, although these recommendations may put you closer to the ballpark of what most people likely need, it is simply impossible to make a blanket recommendation that will cover everyone’s needs.

 

ALWAYS: Check with your doctor BEFORE taking any vitamins or medications.

 

50,000 IU's is equivalent to approximately 1.25 mg

As a rule of thumb, 1,000 IU'swill raise 25(OH)D levels by about 10 ng/mL 

Human toxicity probably begins to occur after chronic daily consumption of approximately 40,000 IU/day (100 of the 400 IU capsules).
 
Humans make at least 10,000 units of Vitamin D within 30 minutes of full body exposure to the sun.

 

Vitamin D Levels Full Articles Below:

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/am-i-getting-too-much-vitamin-d/

http://www.webmd.com/osteoporosis/features/the-truth-about-vitamin-d-can-you-get-too-much-vitamin-d

 

Blood Testing is the ONLY Reliable Way to Determine the Vitamin D level in your body. 

A blood test is extremely important!

 

According to the Vitamin D Council

The Dosage Recommended

John Jacob Cannell MD  Executive Director 2008.10.01

If you use suntan parlors once a week or if you live in Florida and sunbathe once a week, year-round, do nothing. However, if you have little UVB exposure, my advice is as follows: healthy children under the age of 1 years should take 1,000 IU vitamin D3 per day—over the age of 1, 1,000 IU vitamin D3 per every 25 pounds of body weight per day.Well adults and adolescents should take 5,000 IU vitamin D3 per day. Around 2–3 months later have a 25-hydroxyvitamin D blood test, either through ZRT or your doctor.

Start supplementing with the vitamin D before you have the blood test. Then adjust your dose so your 25(OH)D level is between 50–80 ng/ml (125–200 nmol/L), summer and winter. But remember, these are conservative dosage recommendations. Most people who avoid the sun—and virtually all dark-skinned people—will have to increase their dose once they find their blood level is still low, even after two months of the above dosage, especially in the winter. Some people may feel more comfortable ordering the blood test before they start adequate doses of vitamin D. We understand. Test as often as you feel the need to, just remember, no one can get toxic on the doses recommended above and some people will need even more.

 

Vitamin D Found to Influence Over 200 Genes, Highlighting Links to Disease

ScienceDaily (Aug. 24, 2010) — The extent to which vitamin D deficiency may increase susceptibility to a wide range of diseases is dramatically highlighted in newly published research. Scientists have mapped the points at which vitamin D interacts with our DNA -- and identified over two hundred genes that it directly influences.

See Complete Article:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100823172327.htm

 

 

Research Sheds Light on Vitamin D's Role in Immunity

It may be key in protecting people from infections like tuberculosis, study shows

October 12, 2011

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2011 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D plays a critical role in the body's ability to fight off infections like tuberculosis (TB) -- a potentially fatal lung disease, according to a new study.

An international team of researchers found that vitamin D, which is a natural hormone, is linked to human immune reactions and might also help protect against cancer and autoimmune diseases.

See Complete Article:

http://health.usnews.com/health-news/family-health/respiratory-disorders/articles/2011/10/12/research-sheds-light-on-vitamin-ds-role-in-immunity

Too Little Vitamin D May Hasten Disability as You Age
U.S. News & World Report  7-17-13
It's estimated that as many as 90 percent of older people are vitamin D-deficient. The vitamin, usually absorbed through sunlight or diet, plays a key role in bone and muscle health, and a deficiency can lead to reduced bone density, muscle weakness, ...

 

Vitamin D may reduce risk of uterine fibroids
Medical Xpress
Women who had sufficient amounts of vitamin D were 32 percent less likely to develop fibroids than women with insufficient vitamin D, according to a study from researchers at the National Institutes of Health. Fibroids, also known as uterine ...

Routine tasks pose problems for older individuals with vitamin D deficiency
EurekAlert (press release)   7-17-13
Chevy Chase, MD—Vitamin D-deficient older individuals are more likely to struggle with everyday tasks such as dressing or climbing stairs, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical ...
See all stories on this topic »

Allergy risk in obese children may be related to vitamin D deficiency
Family Practice News Digital Network   7-1-13
SAN FRANCISCO – Vitamin D deficiency may help explain why obese children are more at risk than others for allergies and asthma, according to an observational cross-sectional study. "In our population, we found that the allergic profile was increased in ...
 

Study: Vitamin D not related to risk of heart disease in blacks, Hispanics
KOMO News  7-9-13
SEATTLE -- A University of Washington study has found that white and Chinese people with low vitamin D blood levels are at greater risk of heart disease; however, black and Hispanic people with low vitamin D are not. Previous research has suggested ...

 

Link between low vitamin D blood levels and heart disease varies by race
UW Today  7-10-13
Low vitamin D blood levels are linked to greater risk of heart disease in whites and Chinese, but not in blacks and Hispanics, according to a study appearing this week in JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association. Future studies will look ...
 

Can Supplementing Vitamin D Reduce Infections in Patients from Neurosurgical ...
Infection Control Today  7-15-13
Vitamin D influences many other physiological processes, including muscle function, cardiovascular homeostasis, nerve function, and immune response. Furthermore, accumulated evidence suggests that vitamin D also mediates the immune system response ...

Routine tasks pose problems for older individuals with vitamin D deficiency
EurekAlert (press release)  7-17-13
Chevy Chase, MD—Vitamin D-deficient older individuals are more likely to struggle with everyday tasks such as dressing or climbing stairs, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical ...

Ask the Cancer Expert
Toronto Star  6-3-13
A: Vitamin D is needed for healthy bones and muscles, especially in children and the elderly. There is growing evidence that vitamin D may reduce the risk of some types of cancer, particularly colorectal and breast cancers. Experts are now concerned ...
 

Low vitamin D levels associated with higher respiratory illness risk among elderly
NutraIngredients-usa.com  6-3-13
The study author, Vasant Hirani, PhD, found that people with severely deficient vitamin D levels, less than 35 nmol/L, had more than twice the risk of respiratory disease when compared to those in the highest vitamin D quartile, greater than 64 nmol/L ...
 

Serum Vitamin D and Parathyroid Hormone in Relation to Cardiac Structure and ...
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism  5-31-13
Serum Vitamin D and Parathyroid Hormone in Relation to Cardiac Structure and Function: The ICELAND-MI Substudy of AGES-Reykjavik. A. J. van Ballegooijen,; M. Visser,; M. F. Cotch,; A. E. Arai,; M. Garcia,; T. B. Harris,; L. J. Launer,; G. Eiríksdóttir, ...


Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) of Vitamin D Supplementation in Pregnancy ...
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism  5-31-13
Conclusions: Vitamin D supplementation of 2000 and 4000 IU/d appeared safe in pregnancy, and 4000 IU/d was most effective in optimizing serum 25(OH)D concentrations in mothers and their infants. These findings could apply to other populations in which ...
 

For Smokers, Low Levels of Vitamin D May Lead to Cancer
Science Daily (press release)
Mar. 15, 2013 — New research appearing online today in Clinical Chemistry, the journal of AACC, shows that decreased levels of vitamin D may predispose smokers to developing tobacco-related cancer. This study illustrates that simple vitamin D blood ...

Vitamin D Lowers Blood Pressure in Blacks
Food Product Design
DALLAS—Increasing daily intake of vitamin D3 can significantly reduced blood pressure in blacks, according to a new study published in the journal Hypertension. The study found a 3-month regimen of daily vitamin D supplementation increased circulating ...

Improving The Vitamin D Status Of Vitamin D Deficient Adults Is Associated ...
ProHealth
Objective: Suboptimal mitochondrial function has been implicated in several disorders in which fatigue is a prominent feature. Vitamin D deficiency is a well-recognized cause of fatigue and myopathy. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of ...
 

Babies born in May have excess T-cells, greater risk of MS
Wired.co.uk
The month in which babies are born could have an impact on the development of their immune system. Babies born in May were found to have greater levels of the cells responsible for multiple sclerosis, as well as having lower levels of vitamin D ...

 

For Smokers, Low Levels of Vitamin D May Lead to Cancer
Science Daily (press release)
Mar. 15, 2013 — New research appearing online today in Clinical Chemistry, the journal of AACC, shows that decreased levels of vitamin D may predispose smokers to developing tobacco-related cancer. This study illustrates that simple vitamin D blood ...

 

What does your birthday have to do with immune disorders?
CNN
Some have speculated that insufficient levels of vitamin D, which the skin produces when exposed to sunlight, on the mom's part could play a role, since babies born in May are gestated during the colder, darker months, while winter babies are in utero ...
 

Vitamin D may help blacks with high blood pressure
Examiner.com
A clinical trial by John P. Forman, MD, MSc, of the Brigham and Women's Hospital's Kidney Clinical Research Institute in Boston, and colleagues found that vitamin D supplements may modestly lower blood pressure for black adults. Systolic pressure was ...

 

Study reveals potential immune benefits of vitamin D supplements in healthy ...
EurekAlert (press release)
(Boston) – Research from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) shows that improving vitamin D status by increasing its level in the blood could have a number of non-skeletal health benefits. The study, published online in PLOS ONE, reveals for ...
 

Study: Vitamin D May Reduce Risk Of Uterine Fibroids
W*USA 9
WASHINGTON (WUSA9) -- According to the National Institutes of Health, a study found that "women who had sufficient amounts of vitamin D were 32 percent less likely to develop fibroids than women with insufficient vitamin D." The results were released ...

 

Vitamin D study for pregnant women
KSBY San Luis Obispo News
A new study has found that taking Vitamin D supplements during pregnancy does not affect children's bone health. British researchers have tracked thousands of babies for nine years. They found no association between a woman's Vitamin D levels and her ...
 

Vitamin D levels in pregnancy may not affect kids' bone health
WATE-TV
The University of Bristol researchers also found that mothers' vitamin D levels tended to be lowest during the first trimester of pregnancy, and then increased as the pregnancy progressed. As expected, vitamin D levels tended to be lower during the ...
 

Baby's Bone Health Remains Unaffected by Vitamin D Consumption during ...
TopNews United States
Scientists have recently discovered something that contradicts the health advice given by paramedics during pregnancy. It has been revealed that vitamin D intake during pregnancy doesn't benefit bone health of a baby. Currently, NHS recommends 10 ...
 

Study: Vitamin D Pills Lower Smokers' Cancer Risk
Newsmax Health
To reach their conclusions, Danish researchers measured vitamin D levels in blood samples taken from 10,000 Danes between 1981 and 1983. Researchers then followed the study participants for up to 28 years through the Danish Cancer Registry.
 

Right level of vitamin D is source of controversy
Daily Journal Online
We get most of the vitamins we need in our diet. However, vitamin D is found naturally in only a few foods. Fatty fish is the main food source. Milk doesn't naturally contain vitamin D, but it's fortified with it. So are many juices and breakfast ...

Research: Decreased levels of vitamin D may influence smokers to develop ...
News-Medical.net
New research appearing online today in Clinical Chemistry, the journal of AACC, shows that decreased levels of vitamin D may predispose smokers to developing tobacco-related cancer. This study illustrates that simple vitamin D blood tests and ...
 

Vitamin D Deficiency: Are You At Risk?
marie claire magazine Australia
Her wake-up call came in 2012 when Hynes was eight weeks pregnant and a routine blood test showed that although she felt fine, her vitamin D level was severely low. “My doctor was so concerned she told me to start taking vitamin D supplements that day ...
 

Q&A: Value of vitamin D, calcium pills questioned for older women
The Sentinel
The U.S. Preventative Task Force said last Monday there was no benefit for healthy postmenopausal women of taking modest dietary supplements — the normal low-dose supplements of calcium of vitamin D didn't prevent broken bones and could increase ...
 

Vitamin D And Calcium Are Waste Of Money, Study Finds
The Inquisitr
If you've been taking Vitamin D and calcium to make strong bones, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has bad news. According to their most recent recommendation, you've probably been wasting your money. They said that there is little or ...

 

ALWAYS: Check with your doctor BEFORE taking any vitamins or medications.
 

Vitamin D Lowers Blood Pressure in Blacks
Food Product Design
DALLAS—Increasing daily intake of vitamin D3 can significantly reduced blood pressure in blacks, according to a new study published in the journal Hypertension. The study found a 3-month regimen of daily vitamin D supplementation increased circulating ...

 

Vitamin D may reduce nonalcoholic fatty liver disease risk in healthy men
Food Consumer
Editor's note: Vitamin D is an important element for your life. The study, however, does not prove that high serum vitamin D is the cause for the reduced risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease although the possibility could not be excluded either ...
 

Low Vitamin D levels lead to afternoon drowsiness.
Men's Journal
If you frequently doze off during the day, low vitamin D could be a culprit. A recent study found that people who are chronically tired tend to have lower levels of D than those who experience only infrequent or mild daytime fatigue - and many ...
 

New Study Finds Labels on Vitamin D Supplements Often Wrong
Yahoo! News (blog)
In a research letter published on Monday in the Journal of the American Medical Association-Internal Medicine, scientists noted that they found that vitamin D pills that they prescribed during their studies often did not have the potency that the ...
 

To D or not to D — should you get Vitamin D from the pill or the sun — that ...
Dallas Morning News (blog)
While Todd agrees that most dermatologists prefer to steer people away from the sun, opting for Vitamin D to be taken in supplement form, out of concern for possible skin cancer, he notes that others talk about how the Vitamin D that you get as a ...
 

Obesity Can Cause Vitamin D Deficiency, Genetic Study Shows
Medscape
"While many health messages have focused on a lack of sun exposure or excessive use of suncreams, we should not forget that vitamin D deficiency is also caused by obesity," lead author Elina Hypponen, PhD, from the Institute of Child Health at ...

Vitamin D Reduces Risk of Uterine Fibroids - Natural Products INSIDER
Natural Products INSIDER
BETHESDA, Md.—Adequate levels of vitamin D may reduce the risk of uterine fibroids, according to a study published in the journal, Epidemiology. Women who had sufficient amounts of vitamin D were 32% less likely to develop fibroids than women with ...


Low vitamin D levels may increase risk of Type 1 diabetes
EurekAlert (press release)
Boston, MA – Having adequate levels of vitamin D during young adulthood may reduce the risk of adult-onset type 1 diabetes by as much as 50%, according to researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). The findings, if confirmed in future ...
 

Multiple sclerosis patients should use vitamin D
Food Consumer
Wednesday Jan 29, 2013 (foodconsumer.org) -- A review study suggests vitamin D insufficiency may have something to do with the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. And authors of the review recommend that MS patients should take moderate doses of ...
 

Breast Cancer Risk – Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Disease
Patch.com
new_asset_attachment_attributes. A prospective study led by researchers from the UC San Diego School of Medicine has found that low serum vitamin D levels in the months preceding diagnosis may predict a high risk of pre-menopausal breast cancer.
 

Vitamin D lack linked to cancer growth
UPI.com
"While the mechanisms by which vitamin D could prevent breast cancer are not fully understood, this study suggests that the association with low vitamin D in the blood is strongest late in the development of the cancer," Garland said in a statement ...
The Vitamin That Leads to Stronger Mus…
Men's Health News
Even though vitamin D's usual claim to fame is its role in helping your bones absorb calcium, the researchers say that vitamin D also plays a crucial role in developing your Type II skeletal (a.k.a. fast-twitch) muscle fibers. As for why the vitamin ...


 

Vitamin D may indeed help fight cancer
Food Consumer
By David Liu Friday April 27, 2012 (foodconsumer.org) -- Many studies have suggested that high levels of serum vitamin D may help prevent cancers such as breast cancer and prostate cancer, but the mechanism(s) remains unknown.

 

Aspirin may aid cancer prevention

Scientists say aspirin could soon be added to guidelines

Author: By Madison Park, CNN
Published On: Apr 10 2012 02:23:59 PM EDT  Updated On: Apr 11 2012 04:03:41 PM EDT

http://www.local10.com/thats-life/health/Aspirin-may-aid-cancer-prevention/-/1717022/10410994/-/ulrvsxz/-/index.html?treets=mia&tid=2654913193813&tml=mia_health&tmi=mia_health_1_02000504122012&ts=H

 

ALWAYS: Check with your doctor BEFORE taking any vitamins or medications.

 

Clear Brain Plaques with This Nutrient

By RealAge

September 30, 2011

 

If your mother gave you vitamin D-rich cod liver oil when you were a child, she may have been way ahead of her time.

A new animal study from Japan suggests that vitamin D may help clear the brain of amyloid beta, a toxic protein-like compound that accumulates in the brains of Alzheimer's patients.

Human Research Support
This animal study validates the results of a previous study done in human Alzheimer's patients. In the human study, vitamin D together with curcumin -- a chemical found in turmeric spice -- appeared to stimulate the immune system in a way that helped clear the brain of toxic amyloid beta. But this new animal research suggests that vitamin D alone may be able to do that job nicely. Even more amazing, the lab animals that received vitamin D were able to remove a significant amount of amyloid beta buildup in their brains, literally overnight. It seems the vitamin may somehow regulate production of transporter proteins that ferry amyloid beta across the blood-brain barrier and out of the brain. Pretty exciting stuff.

See Complete Article:

http://www.realage.com/health-tips/vitamin-d-prevents-alzheimers-plaques

 

Vitamin D May Affect Lung Transplant Success
MSN Health & Fitness
FRIDAY, April 27, 2012 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D is important for the health of lung transplant patients, a new study suggests. Researchers from Loyola University Health System in Chicago found that vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increase in ...
 

Vitamin D may slash pancreatic cancer risk: Harvard study

By Stephen Daniells    December 14, 2011

Increased blood levels of vitamin D may decrease the risk of developing pancreatic cancer by an impressive 30%, according to a new Harvard-led study.

See the complete article:

Vitamin D supplements could decrease risk of heart disease by 60 percent

Dec. 7,   2011
 
In a study done by the University of Kansas, more than 10,000 patients were observed in relation to their vitamin D intake. Researchers discovered that more than 70 percent of those being analyzed were suffering from vitamin D deficiency, which makes them highly susceptible to health problems, like diabetes, high blood pressure, and cardiomyopathy.

Also, a vitamin D deficiency nearly doubles an individual’s chances of dying.

See the complete article:

Manganiello: New developments on vitamin D3

Health and Well-being  Dr. Jim Manganiello     November 25, 2011

I've written before about the importance of vitamin D3 for health and well-being. New studies confirm that vitamin D3 plays a powerful role in protecting us from chronic diseases, including heart disease, cancer, multiple sclerosis and life-threatening infections.

Recent research published in the Archives of Internal Medicine indicates that people with the lowest vitamin D levels have more than twice the risk of dying of serious illness than do people with highest vitamin D levels.

Additional studies also show significantly greater heart attack, prostate cancer and colon cancer risk in those deficient in vitamin D.

See Complete Article:

http://www.newburyportnews.com/lifestyle/x1938324308/Manganiello-New-developments-on-vitamin-D3

 

Low Vitamin D Hikes Death Risk in Elderly
MedPage Today
This study found that low vitamin D levels common among women in nursing homes may increase their risk of dying within a few years. Note that only 7% of the female nursing home population had adequate levels of at least 50 nmol/L when tested during ...
 

Researchers explain how vitamin D may benefit Alzheimer's patients
Private MD
Blood tests for vitamin D levels may play an important role in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease patients. New research indicates that the nutrient activates processes in the immune system that may support health brain function.

FOX MEDICAL TEAM: Vitamin D Deficiency
MyFox Atlanta
But that extra protection may be leaving us at risk for a Vitamin D deficiency. Studies show most Americans are only getting about half the recommended dose of Vitamin D from their diet. That could be undermining everything from our bones to our hearts ...
 »

 
Many health problems may be linked to low vitamin D levels
Private MD
For individuals who have experienced extended bouts of low mood and energy levels that have gone unexplained, it may be time to talk to the doctor about blood testing for vitamin D. Experts say that this nutrient is linked to a number of areas of ...
 
Vitamin D may help prevent stress fracture - study
Food Consumer
By David Liu Tursday, March 8, 2012 (foodconsumer.org) -- Taking vitamin D supplements can not only prevent vitamin D deficiency, but also prevent stress fracture, according to a new study published in the March 5, 2012 issue of Archives of Pediatrics ...
 
Vitamin D Shrinks Fibroid Tumors in Rats
PharmaLive.com (press release)
Moreover, African-American women are roughly 10 times more likely to be deficient in vitamin D (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16549493) than are white women. In previous research, the study authors found that vitamin D inhibited the growth of ...
 
People's Pharmacy: Will coconut oil stop dementia?
Houston Chronicle
Q: My father was told he had low levels of vitamin D and that he should take a supplement. He read about vitamin D helping lots of problems, including diabetes, arthritis and the muscle pain from statin cholesterol-lowering drugs.
 

Vitamin D Boosts Lifespan
Newsmax Health
A pair of studies released independently this week underscores the importance of vitamin D in keeping bones healthy and lengthening lifespan. A study to be published in the April issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ...
 

 

ALWAYS: Check with your doctor BEFORE taking any vitamins or medications.

 

Researchers determine vitamin D blood level for reducing major medical risks ...
Medical Xpress   May 1st, 2012

Vitamin D blood levels are lower during the dark days of winter. Credit: Allison C. Gray In testing older patients' blood vitamin D levels, there's uncertainty about where the dividing line falls between enough and not enough. The threshold amount has ...
 

Aging to Perfection - Eating for Healthy Aging
San Angelo Standard Times
These include: calcium, vitamin D, vitamin B12, zinc and water. Calcium requires special attention in your diet to help prevent osteoporosis. The target calcium intake for most post-menopausal women is 1200 mg/day. Food sources of calcium include ...

Nutritionist Victoria Wood Draws a Crowd at McLean, VA High School
Patch.com     April 30, 2012
Of particular concern is the common affliction of Vitamin D deficiency. For years scientists have known that the further people live from the equator, the lower the Vitamin D levels will be in that population. Vitamin D controls 200 genes in the body ...

 

Breast Cancer Race Differences Have Link to Vitamin D Gene
MedPage Today
Note that this study suggests that genetic variants in the vitamin D pathway may be related to the higher prevalence of ER-negative breast cancer in African-American women. Genetic variation in the vitamin D pathway might be part of the reason ...
 

 
CDC study says Americans getting enough vitamins, Abilene experts less sure
ReporterNews.com
Based off blood and urine samples collected between 2003 and 2006, the report examines levels of vitamin D, folate, iodine, iron and fatty acids by ethnicity and gender. Those demographic dividers revealed some discrepancies: non-Hispanic blacks had a ...
 

High vitamin D use linked to fewer stress fractures in females
Vancouver Sun
Girls and young women who took lots of vitamin D were half as likely to suffer a stress fracture as those who didn't get much of the vitamin, according to a US study that followed thousands of girls. Stress fractures are small cracks in the bones that ...
 

UA expert advises against high doses of supplements
Arizona Daily Star   May 2, 2012
That vitamin D and calcium you're taking could be causing more harm than good, a new article in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute says. The paper, co-authored by a professor at the University of Arizona's Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of ...

 

Safe amount of vitamin D during pregnancy and lactation
News-Medical.net   May 2, 2012
Women who do not receive enough vitamin D during pregnancy and lactation can experience serious health problems for themselves and their baby, but health experts offer conflicting advice on what constitutes a safe amount. The latest research on vitamin ...
 

Why we know so little about effects of vitamin D supplements
MinnPost.com
By Susan Perry | 09:39 am Despite all the positive headlines about vitamin D, we really don't have any solid evidence yet that taking vitamin D in supplemental form will improve our health. The March issue of The Scientist has a great article outlining ...
 
What was that again about vitamin D?
Dairy Herd Management
New research on vitamin D and its apparent ability to reduce stress fractures in girls seem to raise as many questions as it answers. But they didn't find a positive relationship between dairy intake and the reduced incidence of stress fractures.
Vitamin D May Decrease Risk for Crohn's Disease
Medscape
March 1, 2012 — Increased intake of vitamin D may significantly reduce the risk for Crohn's disease (CD) in women, according to an article published online December 12 and in the March issue of Gastroenterology. Investigators led by Ashwin ...
 
Mayo Clinic: Vitamin D's Link to Diseases Prevalent in Black Americans
HealthCanal.com
Vitamin D is primarily produced in the body through direct exposure of the skin to sunlight. While it has long been touted for its important role in maintaining healthy bones, more recent research suggests that sustaining healthy levels of vitamin D in ...
 

These supplements fight prostate cancer
Food Consumer
By David Liu, PHD Saturday April 14, 2012 (foodconsumer.org) -- Vitamin D and soy may have a protective effect against prostate cancer and a new study in the March 27, 2012 issue of the journal Prostate suggests that a combination of vitamin D in the ...

 

Researchers explain how vitamin D may benefit Alzheimer's patients
Private MD
Blood tests for vitamin D levels may play an important role in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease patients. New research indicates that the nutrient activates processes in the immune system that may support health brain function.

 

 
Vitamin D won't ease COPD symptoms: Study
CBS News
(CBS) Many patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), one of the most common lung diseases, have vitamin D deficiency. But a new study shows that high doses of vitamin D won't help. COPD, also known as "chronic bronchitis" or ...
Vitamin D won't help most COPD patients
USA TODAY
By Steven Reinberg, HealthDay Vitamin D supplements don't seem to help most patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a new study by Belgian investigators. "Vitamin D restoration to normal levels in COPD ...
 

 
Vitamin D linked to reduced risk of colorectal cancer
Examiner.com
Now a new study indicates that raising blood levels of vitamin D may reduce the risk of this often deadly cancer by nearly 40%. In the new study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, the researchers also found that dietary calcium was ...
 
Most need more Vitamin D in the winter
KSDK
By Dana Dean St. Louis (KSDK) -- Vitamin D can prevent disease, but we may not be getting enough of the nutrient in the winter. According to the Harvard School of Public Health, low levels of Vitamin D are a big concern. And they say Vitamin D plays a ...
»
 
Vitamin D may help functioning of ageing in eyes: Study
NutraIngredients.com
The researcher team, from the Institute of Ophthalmology at University College London (UCL), UK, said they hope the findings may mean vitamin D supplements could provide a simple and effective way to combat age-related eye diseases, such as macular ...

ALWAYS: Check with your doctor BEFORE taking any vitamins or medications.
 

Painkiller From the Sky? Sunshine Vitamin May Help Older People With Chronic Pain

Posted: 04/13/2012 11:46 am

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mel-walsh/vitamin-d-pain_b_1364132.html

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Many at-risk individuals are unaware of vitamin D deficiency dangers
Private MD
Many individuals may benefit from vitamin D testing, as a new study indicates that a large percentage of individuals most at risk for experiencing a deficiency do not take steps to address the potential problem.

 
Response to CRP and vitamin D association finding from Vitamin D Newsletter
Food Consumer
By John Cannell, MD of Vitamin D Council In a paper critical of higher levels of vitamin D for allegedly increasing a marker of inflammation, c-reactive protein (CRP), Drs. Muhammad Amer and Rehan Qayyum of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, ...
 
Higher death risk for men with low vitamin D: Swedish study
The Local.se
Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with increased mortality in elderly men, a new Swedish study has shown. "The sun's importance to us is made very clear," researcher Helena Johansson told The Local. Johansson and her team at Sahlgrenska ...
 

 
How the right vitamins can improve your daily diet
Scottish Daily Record
WINTER brings shorter days with less sunshine so we miss out on vital Vitamin D. And we also need other {vitamins to help our immune systems fight the cold and flu illnesses, which are rife this season. But chefs and nutritionists at a Scots restaurant ...
 

 

Nation's nutrition is good, but some disparities remain
American Medical News
The most significant deficiency involves dark skin and vitamin D. Thirty-one percent of that population has insufficient levels of the vitamin, compared with 12% of Mexican-Americans and 3% of whites. The findings were released April 2 in the CDC's second ...

 

Vitamin D blood level for reducing major medical risks in older adults ...
Science Daily (press release)
ScienceDaily (May 1, 2012) — In testing older patients' blood vitamin D levels, there's uncertainty about where the dividing line falls between enough and not enough. The threshold amount has become controversial as several scientific societies set ...
 
Vitamin D for pregnant women and babies -- how much is enough?
FirstScience  May 2, 2012
By American Academy of Pediatrics BOSTON – Women who do not receive enough vitamin D during pregnancy and lactation can experience serious health problems for themselves and their baby, but health experts offer conflicting advice on what constitutes a ...
 

Vitamin-D deficiency can hit heart
Deccan Chronicle
Vitamin D deficiency not only increases chances of cardiac ailments and heart attacks but also reduces efficacy of cholesterol-related medicines, according to medical experts. Vitamin D deficiency had till date been associated with ailments such as ...
 

Vitamin D May Be Overused
ThirdAge
A recent surge of vitamin D recommendations has Americans taking the supplement to prevent everything from bone fractures to cancer. According to the Boston Globe, however, a new Tufts Medical Center study shows that taking too much vitamin D can ...

 

Are you taking too much vitamin D?
The Boston Globe
By Deborah Kotz Many Americans have been warned that they're deficient in vitamin D and need to take supplements to protect against all the purported ills of getting too little of the vitamin, such as heart disease, diabetes, fractures, and a variety ...
 

How Much Vitamin D Do You Need?
LifeGoesStrong
Supplements aren't the only source of vitamin D. You can get it from sun exposure as well as from the food pictured here: salmon, fortified cereal, fortified milk and egg yolk If you follow medical news, you've probably heard a lot about the purported ...
 

 
U.S. Study Finds Calcium, Vitamin D Combo Reduces Fracture Risk
Natural Products INSIDER
Limited data from RCTs suggested high-dose (1000 IU/d) vitamin D supplementation can reduce the risk for total cancer, and data from observational studies suggested higher blood 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-[OH]D) concentrations might be associated with ...
 
Vitamin D deficiency rates cause for concern
HealthCanal.com
Almost one-third of adults over the age of 25 have a Vitamin D deficiency, a new study evaluating the Vitamin D status of Australian adults has found. The paper is the largest study of its kind, drawing on 11218 people from the AusDiab Study and ...
Israelis find vitamin D helps against liver diseases
Jerusalem Post
By JUDY SIEGEL-ITZKOVICH Two Israeli research teams have separately become the first to discover two different benefits from vitamin D against common liver diseases – hepatitis C and cirrhosis. One involved the mechanism in human cells in the lab, ...
Letter: Vitamin debate
Scotsman
Whether or not giving higher dosed vitamin D supplements can improve or prevent certain conditions and diseases will have to be shown in randomised trials as Professor Sattar suggested (your report, 13 January). However, by definition, 70-80 per cent ...
 

The Message: Don't Stop the Vitamin D

Dr. Michael Roizen

Chief Wellness Officer, The Cleveland Clinic

December 3rd, 2010

See the complete article:

http://www.aolhealth.com/2010/12/03/the-message-don-t-stop-the-vitamin-d/

 

How much daily vitamin D should you get?
abc7.com   May 5, 2011
LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- Many health experts were stunned when the Institute of Medicine suggested only a slight increase in the recommended daily allowance for vitamin D. Studies link vitamin D to helping a host of diseases.

See the complete article:   http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?section=news/food_coach&id=8114597

 

Why the New Vitamin D Recommendations Spell Disaster For Your Health

By Dr. J. Mercola | December 11, 2010

In their latest vitamin D report, the Institute of Medicine's Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) claims the only evidence for the benefit of vitamin D they could document was the improvement of bone health.

How they could come to this conclusion is truly beyond belief, because there are literally hundreds if not thousands of studies showing that it benefits dozens if not hundreds of clinical conditions.

See the complete article:

http://www.foodconsumer.org/newsite/Nutrition/Vitamins/new_vitamin_d_recommendations_1112100847.html

 

ALWAYS: Check with your doctor BEFORE taking any vitamins or medications.

 

Race, skin color: Factors in vitamin D deficiency
Medill Reports: Chicago  By Jen Lazuta

Oct 12, 2011

 "We know now that with skin color variation amongst the races, the risk ofvitamin D deficiency increases with darker-skinned individuals," said Dr. Adam Murphy, a clinical instructor in the department of urology at Northwestern ...

 

See the complete article:

http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/chicago/news.aspx?id=190254

 

Vitamin D and breast health

Posted: October 12, 2011 - 12:11am
 

Vitamin D has received a lot of attention lately. We know Vitamin D is important for health by promoting the absorption of calcium from the intestines. If Vitamin D levels are too low, or deficient, adequate calcium cannot be absorbed. Vitamin D is necessary for bone growth during childhood and adolescence, bone healing for fractures, and together with calcium, Vitamin D helps protect older adults from weakening of the bones, or osteoporosis.

Vitamin D has other important roles in the body. This vitamin is important for regulating the growth of cells, preserving immune function, and reducing inflammation. Vitamin D has also been shown to help stabilize various genes and our DNA. Recent studies support Vitamin D for breast cancer prevention. Vitamin D acts as a hormone to help stabilize cell growth in the breast, and may help reduce the risk of breast cancer. We know there is an increased incidence of Vitamin D deficiency (or low Vitamin D levels), in women who are diagnosed with breast cancer. Maintaining normal Vitamin D levels after a diagnosis of breast cancer is important, and may help stabilize breast tissue, and reduce the risk of recurrence. We also know the treatment of breast cancer has been associated with Vitamin D deficiency, particularly in women who need anti-estrogen medication. Studies have shown that many of the musculo-skeletal symptoms in women, particularly in women taking anti-estrogen medication, may be relieved by normalizing the level of Vitamin D. This is exciting and new information, and helps us in our ability to care for patients, and maintain a good quality of life during breast cancer treatment.

See the complete article:

http://www.blufftontoday.com/bluffton-news/2011-10-12/vitamin-d-and-breast-health

 

 

Vitamin D May Lower Parkinson's Risk

Low Levels of Vitamin D Linked to Higher Risk of Parkinson’s Disease, Researchers Say
ByBill Hendrick  WebMD Health News

July 13, 2010 -- Higher levels ofvitamin D may reduce the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, a new study suggests.

The finding builds on previous research linking low vitamin D levels to Parkinson’s, and could mean that getting more sunlight and assuring an adequate dietary intake of vitamin D may help some people ward off the neurological disorder.

Paul Knekt, DPH, and colleagues at the National Institute for Health and Welfare in Helsinki, Finland, studied 3,173 Finnish men and women between the ages of 50 and 79 who did not have Parkinson’s when the research project began in 1978 to 1980.

Participants filled out questionnaires and were interviewed about socioeconomic and health backgrounds and underwentblood tests to be analyzed for vitamin D.

After 29 years, 50 of the participants had been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease.

Participants who had the highest levels of serum vitamin D had a 67% lower risk of developing Parkinson’s than those in the lowest 25% of the group studied.

Despite the overall low vitamin D levels in the study population, a dose-response relationship was found,” the authors write. “This study was carried out in Finland, an area with restricted sunlight exposure, and is thus based on a population with a continuously low vitamin D status.”

Therefore, the average serum vitamin D levels in the entire studied population were about 50% of what is considered optimal.

See the complete article:   http://www.webmd.com/parkinsons-disease/news/20100713/vitamin-d-may-lower-parkinsons-risk

 

What Do You Lack? Probably Vitamin D

Vitamin D promises to be the most talked-about and written-about supplement of the decade. While studies continue to refine optimal blood levels and recommended dietary amounts, the fact remains that a huge part of the population — from robust newborns to the frail elderly, and many others in between — are deficient in this essential nutrient.
 
If the findings of existing clinical trials hold up in future research, the potential consequences of this deficiency are likely to go far beyond inadequate bone development and excessive bone loss that can result in falls and fractures. Every tissue in the body, including the brain, heart, muscles and immune system, has receptors for vitamin D, meaning that this nutrient is needed at proper levels for these tissues to function well.

Studies indicate that the effects of avitamin D deficiency include an elevated risk of developing (and dying from) cancers of the colon, breast and prostate;high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease;osteoarthritis; and immune-system abnormalities that can result in infections andautoimmune disorders likemultiple sclerosis,Type 1 diabetes andrheumatoid arthritis.

See the complete article:  http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/27/health/27brod.html?_r=1

 

Vitamin D Warning: Too much can harm your heart

(Over 100ng/dl)

The normal range for vitamin D was 41 to 80 nanograms per deciliter (ng/dl). Patients in the study were designated as having excessive vitamin D had had readings above 100 ng/dl.

By
msnbc.com contributor
updated 11/16/2011 3:50:04 PM ET 2011-11-16T20:50:04

When it comes to the heart, vitamin D can be a double-edged sword.

Scientists have long known that low levels of the nutrient can hurt the heart, but new research shows that higher than normal levels can make it beat too fast and out of rhythm, a condition called atrial fibrillation, according to a report presented at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association.

The study, which followed 132,000 patients at a Utah based medical center, found that the risk of newly developed atrial fibrillation jumped almost three-fold when blood levels of vitamin D were high.

Most people get at least some of their daily needs of vitamin D from sunlight. But in cold northern climates where everyone bundles up for the winter -- inadvertently blocking rays that raise the body’s vitamin D levels  -- people are often encouraged to take supplements to boost levels of the nutrient to protect the bones and heart, said the study’s lead author, Dr. Jared Bunch, director of electrophysiology research at the Intermountain Medical Center in Murray, Utah.

However, because everyone absorbs these supplements differently, blood levels need to be tested to make sure they’re in the safe range, Bunch explained.

High levels of vitamin D only occur when people take supplements, Bunch said. Because consumers assume supplements sold over the counter are safe, they may not realize the danger of taking too much vitamin D, he added.

See the complete article:

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/45325473/ns/health-diet_and_nutrition/

 

Blood Testing is the ONLY Reliable Way to Determine Vitamin D Levels in your body.

A blood test is extremely important!

 

The Vitamin-D Debate  

By Sanjay Gupta, M.D. Monday, May. 18, 2009

About 10 to 15 minutes spent outside in full sun will give a fair-skinned person dressed only in his skivvies 10,000 to 20,000 IUs. Turns out the debate about how much vitamin D we need has intensified over the past 10 years. One part of the discourse focuses on the growing body of research that points to numerous health benefits of the chemical (actually a hormone): it can help prevent rickets in children and severe bone loss in adults and potentially lowers the risk of multiple sclerosis, juvenile diabetes, cancer, heart disease, colds and influenza. Amid all this new evidence, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) has assembled a panel of experts to re-evaluate just how much vitamin D we really need and can safely tolerate. Current IOM recommendations, set in 1997, are 200 IUs a day from birth to age 50 and a bit more after that. The upper limit of safety, according to the institute, is 2,000 IUs daily--too much can lead to, among other things, nausea and kidney stones--yet some vitamin-D proponents are pushing for up to 4,000 IUs a day for adults.

 

Low Vitamin D Linked to Aggressive Breast Cancer
WebMD
By Salynn Boyles April 29, 2011 -- Women with low vitamin D levels may have an increased risk for the most aggressive breast cancers, new research suggests. Several earlier studies have suggested a link between low vitamin Dlevels and breast cancer

See the complete article:

http://www.webmd.com/breast-cancer/news/20110429/low-vitamin-d-linked-to-aggressive-breast-cancer

 

 

Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Diabetes Risk
Reuters  4-27-11
By Leigh Krietsch Boerner NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Lower levels of vitamin D circulating in the bloodstream are tied to a higher risk of developing diabetes in a new study of Australian adults. After following more than 5000 people for 5 years, ...

See the complete article:

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/04/27/us-vitamind-diabetes-idUSTRE73Q6VH20110427


 

Vitamin D Cuts Cancer and Heart Disease Risk by Up to Fifty Percent
Natural News.com
(NaturalNews) Health conscious individuals have been closely following Vitamin D research for the past decade as volumes of scientific evidence prove this ...

See the complete article:

http://www.naturalnews.com/029880_vitamin_D_heart_disease.html

 

Vitamin D Deficiency May Cause Cancer

 

Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to several different cancers, according to a new study.

The researchers analyzed vitamin D levels in blood samples from 160 cancer patients. They found that 42 percent had insufficient levels of vitamin D (between 20 and 30 nanograms per milliliter of blood) and 32 percent had vitamin D deficiency (less than 20 ng/mL).

Among the participants, the average level of vitamin D was 24 ng/mL. Anyone who lay below this level were nearly three times more likely to have stage III cancer than those with higher levels of vitamin D.

These findings are only preliminary, and have not yet been peer-reviewed, but they suggest that vitamin D could play an important role in cancer in cancer prevention and treatment. It also goes hand in hand with previous research, which has indicated that vitamin D plays a role in regulating the spread and multiplication of cancer cells, and has anti-tumor properties.

According to study author Thomas Churilla, the researchers administered vitamin D to the participants with low vitamin D levels, but it was too early to tell whether this improved their prognosis.

Good sources of vitamin D include fatty fish such as salmon or mackerel, milk, and certain breakfast cereals. Vitamin D can also be absorbed through direct exposure to sunlight.

The research was presented at the American Society for Radiation Oncology.

See the complete article:

http://www.thirdage.com/news/vitamin-d-deficiency-may-cause-cancer_10-07-2011

 

Those with cancer tend to lack vitamin D

Published:  Oct 4, 2011

See the complete article:
:http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2011/10/04/Those-with-cancer-tend-to-lack-vitamin-D/UPI-81041317706905/#ixzz1a9OTUmLv

 

 

Vitamin D study suggests that pale people need supplements

ByRyan Jaslow  Oct 4, 2011

(CBS News) Pale? Pasty? A new study suggests you might benefit from a vitamin D supplement.

The English study suggests that pale people tend to be deficient in the "sunshine" vitamin and that without supplements they're unlikely to get their levels up without getting sunburned.

That can put them at risk for bone loss, heart disease, and poorer survival from breast cancer, according to the study's authors.
"This should be considered for fair-skinned people living in a mild climate like the UK and melanoma patients in particular," study author Dr. Julia Newton-Bishop, a cancer researcher at the University of Leeds, said in awritten statement.

For the study - published in the Oct. 4 issue ofCancer Causes and Control - researchers tested vitamin D levels in 1,200 people and found 730 of them had below-normal levels. Levels were lowest in fair-skinned folks.

Vitamin D is associated with healthy bones, and levels below 25 nmol/L s are considered deficient. The study defined 60nmol/L as the normal vitamin D level, which research suggests can be associated with healthy benefits.

The National Institutes of Health recommends vitamin D levels of 50 nmol/L and above for adequate bone health.

Think you're not getting enough vitamin D?

Besides supplements, foods including cod liver oil, salmon, and mackerel contain the daily value of vitamin D, while foods like, tuna, milk, yogurt, and eggs contain some amounts of the vitamin.

Sara Hiom, director of health information at Cancer Research U.K, said in the statement, "If you are worried about your vitamin D levels, our advice is to go see your doctor."

The NIH's office of dietary supplements hasmore on vitamin D.
 


 

Scientists Taking Vitamin D in Droves
Globe and Mail
Bruce Hollis, a pediatrics professor at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, who has spent years studying vitamin D, recently increased...

See the complete article:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health/scientists-taking-vitamin-d-in-droves/article1649132/
 

 

ALWAYS: Check with your doctor BEFORE taking any vitamins or medications.

 

Tired? Rundown? Check Your Vitamin D

Posted - 6/15/2010 at 10:31AM

TUCSON - Vitamin D is known as the sunshine vitamin, because sunlight exposure to skin is the best and only natural source for it. It's known to be essential for bone health, but research shows it's also crucial for fighting all kinds of diseases.

Todd Whitthorne, a health and wellness expert said, "We're finding that when we measure thousands of patients, the vast majority of them are low."

And Dr. Richard Honaker, a family practice physician, sees the same trends, "If you're low on vitamin D, your immune system does not function as well, or you're more susceptible to infections. There's a greater incidence of heart attacks and strokes in people that are vitamin D deficient versus people who are okay on their vitamin D levels."

See this entire article:  http://www.kvoa.com/news/tired-rundown-check-your-vitamin-d/

 

How to Get the Most Out of Your Vitamin D Supplement

 Triston Sanders - Medical Anchor
WCTV

May 10, 2010

Your body may make better use of a vitamin D supplement if you take it with your largest meal.
Researchers at the Cleveland Clinic examined 17 patients with Vitamin D deficiency.
Over a period of two to three months, the patients were told to take Vitamin D supplements with the biggest meal they ate each day. This boosted the level of Vitamin D in their blood by an average of 56%, the researchers said.
The study was recently published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

 

Even on Formula, Babies Not Getting Enough Vitamin D.......

From:  CNN.com 

By Denise Mann, Health.com March 22, 2010 6:19 p.m. EDT

 

Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/03/22/vitamin.d.babies/?hpt=Sbin

HOUSTON, TX - May 18, 2009 - Current recommendations for Vitamin D were called "grossly inadequate" at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) 18th Annual Meeting & Clinical Congress. "National recommendations from the Food and Nutrition Board are 400 to 600 International Units (IU) a day," Neil Binkley, MD, an Associate Professor in Geriatrics and Endocrinology at the University of Wisconsin said. "That's simply not enough." "Experts recommend somewhere between 1500 to 2600 IU daily," Dr. Binkley said. "It's considered a very safe vitamin. One would need daily doses of 40,000 IU or higher before seeing negative side effects."

Dr. John  Cannell MD is a psychiatrist at Atascadero State Hospital in California, a maximum security hospital for psychiatric patients.  In 2005, an influenza A epidemic broke out in the hospital.  One by one, each ward became infected as patients came down with chills, fever, cough, and severe body aches. Only one ward in the hospital remained free of infection — Dr. Cannell’s.  Why was this so? His patients intermingled with patients from other wards and were not noticeably different in their age, health, or medical treatment. The only difference that could be discerned was that Dr. Cannell’s patients had been receiving a daily dose of 2000 IU of vitamin D for several months. That’s it.  All of his patients took vitamin D and not one caught the flu!  (Melanie Segala 07/15/2009)

 

Vitamin D doesn't prevent heart attack or cancer, study says

By Kerry Grens      Thursday, December 8, 2011

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Among seniors with a high risk of bone fractures, taking vitamin D or calcium pills has no impact on their chances of dying from cancer or vascular disease, researchers say in a new study.

Vitamin D is considered beneficial for bone health, and earlier studies have found that having low vitamin D levels in the blood is tied to a greater chance of dying from heart problems (see Reuters Health reports of November 25, 2011 and June 24, 2011).

The thinking, therefore, has been that taking extra vitamin D might cut that risk.

See the complete article:

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_119541.html

 

Vitamin D Deficiency is Why You Get Flu!

Posted by Dr. Mercola |  From: http://www.foodconsumer.org  |  March 25,  2010

http://www.foodconsumer.org/newsite/Nutrition/Vitamins/vitamin_d_deficiency_is_why_you_get_flu_2503100412.html

Taken from the above article:

Based on the latest research, many experts now agree you need about 35 IU’s of vitamin D per pound of body weight. This recommendation also includes children, the elderly and pregnant women.

However, keep in mind that vitamin D requirements are highly individual, as your vitamin D status is dependent on numerous factors, such as the color of your skin, your location, and how much sunshine you’re exposed to on a regular basis. So, although these recommendations may put you closer to the ballpark of what most people likely need, it is simply impossible to make a blanket recommendation that will cover everyone’s needs.

The only way to determine your optimal is to get your blood tested. Ideally, you’ll want to maintain a vitamin D level of 50-65 ng/ml year-round.

 

 

ALWAYS: Check with your doctor BEFORE taking any vitamins or medications.

 

Vitamin D More Effective Than Previously Known

Editorial by Bill Faloon of Life Extension Foundation:

A large number of new vitamin D studies have appeared in the scientific literature since I wrote my plea to the federal government. These studies don’t just confirm what we knew 16 months ago—they show that optimizing vitamin D intake will save even more lives than what we projected.

 

For instance, a study published in June 2008 showed that men with low vitamin D levels suffer 2.42 times more heart attacks. Now look what this means in actual body counts.

Each year, about 157,000 Americans die from coronary artery disease-related heart attacks.4Based on this most recent study, if every American optimized their vitamin D status, the number of deaths prevented from this kind of heart attack would be 92,500.

To put the number of lives saved in context, tens of millions of dollars are being spent to advertise that Lipitor® reduces heart attacks by 37%. This is certainly a decent number, but not when compared with how many lives could be saved by vitamin D. According to the latest study, men with the higher vitamin D levels had a 142% reduction in heart attacks.

 

Read More of This Incredible Story:

http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2009/jan2009_Millions-of-Needless-Deaths_01.htm

 

What Is Vitamin D Deficiency Anyway...

 www.easy-immune-health.com

Naturally, this would be the first question to answer before we can actually TREATvitamin D deficiency. I’ve answered this question on theNormal Vitamin D Level page, and you should go there right now to find out what your vitamin D level SHOULD be- and the answer is NOT the same answer that is on your lab sheet.

The lab sheet does not provide you with what the optimal’ Vitamin D Levels are. And many researchers believe that the low level on your lab sheet is WAY too low and should be considered “vitamin D Insufficiency” rather than ‘Low Normal Vitamin D Level’.

Despite the argument for D3 that was made, the D2 will certainly not harm you and will be effective at correcting your deficiency. If, however, you read the argument and prefer not to take D2 (a good choice), then going out and buyingVitamin D Supplements in the form of Vitamin D3 is really the best choice.

Either way, youSHOULD be using Vitamin D3 for yourDaily Vitamin D Requirements after your regimen of Vitamin D Deficiency Treatment is finished.

 

 

The Right KIND of Vitamin D Supplements

Once you find out your Vitamin D Level, you need to decide what KIND ofVitamin D Supplements to take for your Vitamin D Deficiency Treatment. The BEST vitamin D supplements are those containing Vitamin D3- also known as Cholecalciferol, and you can see theVitamin D 2 vs Vitamin D3 argument on that page. But if you are being followed by a doctor for your Vitamin D Deficiency Treatment, it’s likely that you will get a prescription for Vitamin d 2- also called ergocalciferol.

 

ALWAYS: Check with your doctor BEFORE taking any vitamins or medications.

 

 

Vitamin D Deficiency Treatment Protocols

It is becoming more and more apparent that the Vitamin D Dosage required for a normal vitamin D level is MUCH higher than you might think. In fact, it is such a large amount that many doctors just won’t give enough to actually correct the deficiency- although this is changing as doctors are becoming more experienced with vitamin D deficiency treatment.  

Vitamin D Deficiency Treatment Protocols

 

Most Adults

Most Children aged 1 to 18

 

Dr. Michael Holick

50,000 IU's D2 once/week for 8 weeks
Repeat if Level Less than 30 ng/ml

50,000 IU's D2 once/week for 8 weeks

 

Leventis, P.1; Kiely, P. D. W

300,000 IU Vitamin D3
Orally 3 times per year

 

 

The Use of Vitamin D in Clinical Practice

Up to 10,000 IU's per day

 

 

Vitamin D Council

Enough to get the Vitamin D Level
Between 50 -80 ng/ml

Enough to get the Vitamin D Level
Between 50 -80 ng/ml

 

If you have even mild Vitamin D Deficiency, it is likely that you will need to be taking approximately 50,000 IU’s per week for 4 to 12 weeks.

If you have SEVERE deficiency, then you may need to be taking Vitamin D Supplements as high as 50,000 IU’s per DAY for a month or even two months until getting a repeat Vitamin D Serum Level. Some doctors may even give a Vitamin D injection of 600,000 IU’s once a month for several months until your Vitamin D Level gets up to the ‘Optimal Range’ of 40 to 80 ng/ml.

While these doses may seem VERY high to those who are not used to them, they are all acceptable dosages for Vitamin D Deficiency Treatment. There is little risk of aVitamin D Overdose as long as you are getting your Vitamin D Level checked every few months of treatment and then at least every year thereafter. In fact, there has NEVER been a documented case of Vitamin D Overdose on 10,000 IU’s per day or less, in an adult, even when taken for several years!

Read more:http://www.easy-immune-health.com/vitamin-d-deficiency-treatment.html#ixzz0S5D82ONK

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/further-topics/for-health-professionals-position-statement-on-supplementation-blood-levels-and-sun-exposure/

 

50,000 IU's is equivalent to approximately 1.25 mg

As a rule of thumb, 1,000 IU'swill raise 25(OH)D levels by about 10 ng/mL 

Human toxicity probably begins to occur after chronic daily consumption of approximately 40,000 IU/day (100 of the 400 IUcapsules).
 
Humans make at least 10,000 units of Vitamin D within 30 minutes of full body exposure to the sun.

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/vitaminDToxicity.shtml

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/newsletter/2008-may.shtml

 

According to the Vitamin D Council

The Dosage Recommended

John Jacob Cannell MD  Executive Director 2008.10.01

If you use suntan parlors once a week or if you live in Florida and sunbathe once a week, year-round, do nothing. However, if you have little UVB exposure, my advice is as follows: healthy children under the age of 1 years should take 1,000 IU vitamin D3 per day—over the age of 1, 1,000 IU vitamin D3 per every 25 pounds of body weight per day.Well adults and adolescents should take 5,000 IUvitamin D3 per day. Around 2–3 months later have a 25-hydroxyvitamin D blood test, either through ZRT or your doctor.

Start supplementing with the vitamin D before you have the blood test. Then adjust your dose so your 25(OH)D level is between 50–80 ng/ml(125–200 nmol/L), summer and winter. But remember, these are conservative dosage recommendations. Most people who avoid the sun—and virtually all dark-skinned people—will have to increase their dose once they find their blood level is still low, even after two months of the above dosage, especially in the winter. Some people may feel more comfortable ordering the blood test before they start adequate doses of vitamin D. We understand. Test as often as you feel the need to, just remember, no one can get toxic on the doses recommended above and some people will need even more.

 

ALWAYS: Check with your doctor BEFORE taking any vitamins or medications.

 

Today, the FNB has failed millions...

3:00 PM PST November 30, 2010
 
After 13 year of silence, the quasi governmental agency, the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Food and Nutrition Board (FNB), today recommended that a three-pound premature infant take virtually the same amount of vitamin D as a 300 pound pregnant woman. While that 400 IU/day dose is close to adequate for infants, 600 IU/day in pregnant women will do nothing to help the three childhood epidemics most closely associated with gestational and early childhood vitamin D deficiencies: asthma, auto-immune disorders, and, as recently reported in the largest pediatric journal in the world, autism. Professor Bruce Hollis of the Medical University of South Carolina has shown pregnant and lactating women need at least 5,000 IU/day, not 600.

The FNB also reported that vitamin D toxicity might occur at an intake of 10,000 IU/day (250 micrograms/day), although they could produce no reproducible evidence that 10,000 IU/day has ever caused toxicity in humans and only one poorly conducted study indicating 20,000 IU/day may cause mild elevations in serum calcium, but not clinical toxicity.

Viewed with different measure, this FNB report recommends that an infant should take 10 micrograms/day (400 IU) and a pregnant woman 15 micrograms/day (600 IU). As a single, 30 minute dose of summer sunshine gives adults more than 10,000 IU (250 micrograms), the FNB is apparently also warning that natural vitamin D input - as occurred from the sun before the widespread use of sunscreen - is dangerous. That is, the FNB is implying that God does not know what she is doing.

Disturbingly, this FNB committee focused on bone health, just like they did 14 years ago. They ignored the thousands of studies from the last ten years that showed higher doses of vitamin D helps: heart health, brain health, breast health, prostate health, pancreatic health, muscle health, nerve health, eye health, immune health, colon health, liver health, mood health, skin health, and especially fetal health. Tens of millions of pregnant women and their breast-feeding infants are severely vitamin D deficient, resulting in a great increase in the medieval disease, rickets. The FNB report seems to reason that if so many pregnant women have low vitamin D blood levels then it must be OK because such low levels are so common. However, such circular logic simply represents the cave man existence (never exposed to the light of the sun) of most modern-day pregnant women.

Hence, if you want to optimize your vitamin D levels - not just optimize the bone effect - supplementing is crucial. But it is almost impossible to significantly raise your vitamin D levels when supplementing at only 600 IU/day (15 micrograms). Pregnant women taking 400 IU/day have the same blood levels as pregnant women not taking vitamin D; that is, 400 IU is a meaninglessly small dose for pregnant women. Even taking 2,000 IU/day of vitamin D will only increase the vitamin D levels of most pregnant women by about 10 points, depending mainly on their weight. Professor Bruce Hollis has shown that 2,000 IU/day does not raise vitamin D to healthy or natural levels in either pregnant or lactating women. Therefore supplementing with higher amounts - like 5000 IU/day - is crucial for those women who want their fetus to enjoy optimal vitamin D levels, and the future health benefits that go along with it.

For example, taking only two of the hundreds of recently published studies: Professor Urashima and colleagues in Japan, gave 1,200 IU/day of vitamin D3 for six months to Japanese 10-year-olds in a randomized controlled trial. They found vitamin D dramatically reduced the incidence of influenza A as well as the episodes of asthma attacks in the treated kids while the placebo group was not so fortunate. If Dr. Urashima had followed the newest FNB recommendations, it is unlikely that 400 IU/day treatment arm would have done much of anything and some of the treated young teenagers may have come to serious harm without the vitamin D. Likewise, a randomized controlled prevention trial of adults by Professor Joan Lappe and colleagues at Creighton University, which showed dramatic improvements in the health of internal organs, used more than twice the FNB's new adult recommendations.

Finally, the FNB committee consulted with 14 vitamin D experts and – after reading these 14 different reports – the FNB decided to suppress their reports. Many of these 14 consultants are either famous vitamin D researchers, like Professor Robert Heaney at Creighton or, as in the case of Professor Walter Willett at Harvard, the single best-known nutritionist in the world. So, the FNB will not tell us what Professors Heaney and Willett thought of their new report? Why not?

Today, the Vitamin D Council directed our attorney to file a federal Freedom of Information (FOI) request to the IOM's FNB for the release of these 14 reports.

Most of my friends, hundreds of patients, and thousands of readers of the Vitamin D Council newsletter (not to mention myself), have been taking 5,000 IU/day for up to eight years. Not only have they reported no significant side-effects, indeed, they have reported greatly improved health in multiple organ systems. My advice, especially for pregnant women: continue taking 5,000 IU/day until your 25(OH)D is between 50-80 ng/mL (the vitamin D blood levels obtained by humans who live and work in the sun and the mid-point of the current reference ranges at all American laboratories). Gestational vitamin D deficiency is not only associated with rickets, but a significantly increased risk of neonatal pneumonia, a doubled risk for preeclampsia, a tripled risk for gestational diabetes, and a quadrupled risk for primary cesarean section.

Today, the FNB has failed millions of pregnant women whose as yet unborn babies will pay the price. Let us hope the FNB will comply with the spirit of "transparency" by quickly responding to our Freedom of Information requests.

John Cannell, MD
The Vitamin D Council
1241 Johnson Avenue, #134

San Luis Obispo, California, United States 93401

 

 

Vitamin D:  Why You Are Probably NOT Getting Enough and

How That Makes You Sick

Mark Hyman, MD

Posted: May 22, 2010 08:00 AM

What vitamin may we need in amounts up to 25 times higher than the government recommends for us to be healthy?

What vitamin deficiency affects 70-80 percent of the population, is almost never diagnosed and has been linked to manycancers, high blood pressure,heart disease,diabetes,depression,(i) fibromyalgia, chronic muscle pain, bone loss andautoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis?(ii)

What vitamin is almost totally absent from our food supply?

What vitamin is the hidden cause of much suffering that is easy to treat?

The answer to all of these questions isvitamin D.

Read More:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-mark-hyman/vitamin-d-why-you-are-pro_b_585311.html

 

 

 

ALWAYS: Check with your doctor BEFORE taking any vitamins or medications.

Google Links:

The key is D
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Using Vitamin D To Fight H1N1
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"We don't know, yet, if taking Vitamin D will help prevent swine flu, but there really are no risks associated with taking Vitamin D," said Sunny Linnebur,
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Vitamin D lack puts elderly at risk
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By Kate Devlin, Medical Correspondent Those who had higher levels of vitamin D - produced by the body in the presence of sunlight -when diagnosed with colon ...

 

 

ALWAYS: Check with your doctor BEFORE taking any vitamins or medications.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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